New MSP Director Named

ShaRonda Cooper named director of Multicultural Services and Programs

Dr. ShaRonda Cooper, who has served in an interim capacity, has been named director of Multicultural Services and Programs at the University of Georgia. Cooper will provide vision, strategic leadership, and overall supervision for Multicultural Services and Programs, supporting UGA staff’s and students’ efforts to foster a more inclusive, welcoming and equitable community for students at UGA.

In this role, she will also serve as a valuable resource for the UGA community and champion for students, in particular, students from minoritized populations. She will report to Associate Vice President for Student Affairs Michele Howard and serve as a member of the leadership team for the Division of Student Affairs.

Vice President for Student Affairs Victor K. Wilson expressed his excitement for Dr. Cooper to continue her leadership of MSP on a permanent basis.

Dr. Cooper has done much to organize and enhance the work that MSP does,” said Wilson. “I’m confident that her vast array of experiences in supporting college students from many backgrounds and her personal connection with the Athens community prepare her well to continue in this critical campus role.”

Cooper’s appointment is effective May 1.

In this role, Cooper will serve as a primary point of contact, resource, mentor, and champion for students, particularly those from minoritized populations, providing direct support and connections with campus and community resources. She will also be responsible for leading efforts to provide dynamic learning activities, programs, and dialogues that engage diverse perspectives and foster shared understanding, in collaboration with students, student organizations, and campus and community stakeholders.

Cooper desires to enhance understanding and assist the university in providing a strong commitment to supporting its students.

“As a student affairs practitioner, I recognize the collaborative importance of enhancing academic success and fostering a more inclusive, welcoming and equitable campus community,” Cooper said. “My academic training in higher education and counseling, and a strong ability to forge relationships with community partners enable me to address key issues in an informed manner, while maintaining focus on advancing the University’s mission.”

Cooper brings a wealth of expertise in student affairs and student support services. Her background in diversity and inclusion programming includes some time as scholars programs assistant in the Office for Multicultural Student Access and Retention at Ohio University, and as advisor and consultant to multicultural student organizations throughout her career.

Cooper has served as interim director of MSP since July 2019. Previously, she led the University Health Center’s student success and training efforts, and before that, she served as assistant director of the Office of Student Disability Services at the University of North Georgia’s Oconee Campus. She previously assisted students with their mental health needs as a counselor at North Caroline State University, Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio, and Ohio University.

A native Athenian, Dr. Cooper is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), a certified QPR Gatekeeper Instructor, and a Certified Health Coach. She earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Higher Education and a Master of Education in Mental Health and Rehabilitation Counseling, both from Ohio University. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Magna Cum Laude, from Fort Valley State University.

MSP Service Continuity Information

The best resource for ongoing campus-wide updates is https://www.uga.edu/coronavirus/info.php. UGA is updating this site often with new information.

To stay informed of the day-to-day status of Student Affairs and other student services and activities view the Student Affairs updates page.

Multicultural Services and Programs is checking emails and phone voicemails hourly. Please don’t hesitate to check in!

MSP phone: 706-542-5773

MSP email: mspinfo@uga.edu

Staff are working on updating the calendar with cancelations, please check the UGA Master Calendar and the Student Affairs Master Calendar for information about an event you're interested in. 

Native American Heritage Month

Native American Heritage Month
By Marilyn Primovic

From the tragic Trail of Tears to local river names like the Oconee, the state of Georgia carries a vast amount of Native American history.

You may have visited the Etowah Indian Mounds in North Georgia on a school field trip, but learning about Native American identity and culture can move beyond sightseeing and into the way you view the world around you.

The Native American Student Association (NASA) stands ready to celebrate Native American Heritage Month with you, Native and non-Native alike.

“Native American Heritage Month serves as a springboard for the rest of the year,” said Isabelle Riddle, a leader within NASA.

Tiffany R. Smith, senior coordinator for Multicultural Services and Programs, explained how Native American Heritage Month and every heritage month is an experience to learn and grow.

“The UGA community is invited to attend, learn, and participate in the celebration of Native American Heritage Month,” said Smith.

 

Through out the month of November, Multicultural Services and Programs (MSP) in collaboration with campus partners observe and honor Native American heritage, history and legacy. The Pow Wow at Stone Mountain is the biggest Native gathering in Georgia and showcases Native American culture through dance, music, authentic craft demonstrations, cooking traditions, storytelling, wildlife presentations and more. Photos: MSP Staff

 

Riddle explained how it might seem like NASA is only for indigenous students, but the group earnestly desires for members of the UGA community, no matter what background, to be a part of the NASA gatherings and Native American Heritage Month activities.

Smith explained how NASA started with seven students coming together for Heritage Month, and while the number of Natives on campus is small, the impact of sharing Native experiences is immeasurable.

“NASA’s focus is celebrating and teaching our culture by swapping stories and opening our ears to listen to others too,” said Riddle.

She said each individual offers different perspectives, and NASA gatherings serve as an opportunity to learn about these individual experiences while also recognizing the common thread of Native American culture and interest.

Riddle’s grandmother and father lived on Cherokee land in Oklahoma, and while she did not grow up on a reservation, she said her family’s Cherokee heritage impacts her daily life.

“I realized how much my family’s teachings and thoughts about things have been passed on to me in quiet ways,” said Riddle.

 

 

She shared an impactful memory of her family attending an elementary school program where her class dressed up like Pilgrims and Indians. She said her family reminded her through this experience there is so much that goes unsaid about Native American heritage.

“My grandma understood that [dressing up in costumes for Thanksgiving] is the American tale, but it still troubled and saddened her,” said Riddle. “We have the opportunity to correct misconceptions that people do not even realize are inaccurate.”

People do not seek to be wrong, and many people cannot help that they were not taught actual truths about Native Americans, she explained.

 

 

She said she commends UGA for addressing these issues in classes and research.

“We have some people here doing amazing work and classes trying to give you the real picture,” she said.

One of NASA’s goals going forward is to reach out to classes where Native topics are discussed to open more opportunities for students to grow and learn, she said.

One of NASA's aims is to reach out to prospective UGA students with Native American heritage to show them they will be supported if they choose to attend the University.

 

 

“We here at Multicultural Services and Programs are a place for Native American students, and we value their experiences here at UGA,” said Smith.

“It is a big deal to step out of your community to come here, and we want to encourage and connect with you,” said Riddle. “We want this to be a place where you can settle into the ways you were raised or branch out to new things if you want.”

She said her hope the UGA community is for continued learning and open-mindedness.

“This is the reason I do this work,” said Smith. “It is all about loving and caring for each member of the UGA community.”

 

Rite of Sankofa Program

Black Theatrical Ensemble: Celebrating Diversity in Performing Arts

The Black Theatrical Ensemble (BTE) is proud to present their Spring Production, The BTE Experience: A Celebration of Diversity. The event is a 4 day long festival with 3 days of performances from various different organizations and individuals across campus celebrating the diversity present in the performing arts. The festival will run from April 6th-9th at Morton Theatre.

The event will begin with a free celebration kickoff on April 6th at 7pm in Morton Theatre. There will be small performances as well as snacks provided by Insomnia cookies. The remainder of the days, April 7th-9th, will be performance days that are dedicated to Theatre, Dance, and Music respectively. April 7th and 8th have show times starting at 7pm and the April 9th show will begin at 3:30pm. All performances are at Morton Theatre. Individual tickets are $5 for students with a valid UGA ID and $8 for non-students and festival ticket package (includes all 3 nights) are $12 for students and $20 for non-students. Tickets can be purchased presale online or at the Tate Box Office or on the day of the event at the door.


About The Black Theatrical Ensemble (BTE)

BTE was founded at the University of Georgia in 1976 and was created with the purpose of preserving the legacy of Afro-centric theatre through the production of plays, essays, poems, and other literary works written by Black authors and playwrights, and authors of all races who write about issues in the African-American experience. To learn more, email us at bte@uga.edu

Black Theatrical Ensemble
404 Memorial Hall, The University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
(706) 542-8468

bte@uga.edu

Abeneefoo Kuo (ABK)
Honor Society

Abeneefoo Kuo Honor Society

Mission

The purpose of Abeneefoo Kuo Honor Society (ABK) is to provide scholarship, leadership, and service to students, faculty, and staff at UGA and the surrounding community. The goals include: encouraging the pursuit of standards of excellence in all areas, providing enrichment experiences not provided in the regular curriculum, promoting and developing leadership potential, and providing educational, career, and personal assistance to members of ABK and to others.

The Intersection Resources

Book Resources

The Intersection has a growing selection of books related to social justice, equity, access, and the experiences of historically marginalized populations. As a space dedicated to exploring issues of social justice, The Intersection offers free access to its ever growing library of texts.

Books are available for a two week rental period. To borrow a book, please come in to The Intersection and complete check out process.

The following list may not reflect our most recent library additions.

Intersection Book Inventory & Check-Out

 

Campus Resources

Multicultural Services and Programs

LGBT Resource Center

International Student Life

Disability Resource Center

Student Veterans Resource Center

Equal Opportunity Office

Women’s Resources

GLOBES

Black Faculty Staff Organization

 

Academic Resources

Center for Latino Achievement and Success in Education

Institute for African American Studies

Institute for Women’s Studies

Office of International Education

Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute

 

Community Resources

Community Connection

The Cottage

Project Safe

Athens Pride

The Intersection

The Intersection is a dynamic space on campus, offering a platform for UGA students staff and faculty to explore issues of social justice.

 

Vision

We envision a University of Georgia that honors the identities, perspectives, and worldviews of our community in a way that advances social justice and an institutional way of being that models inclusiveness for all students, faculty, and staff.

 

Mission

The Intersection will provide a safe and dynamic learning environment for students, faculty, staff and all members of the university community to explore issues of social justice.

We will achieve this by:

• Challenging assumptions
• Deepening understanding
• Encouraging respectful discourse
• Honoring the intersections of identities
• Constructing knowledge as a catalyst for transformation
• Embracing personal responsibility in dismantling systems of oppression

 

History

In the fall of 2013, the Facebook pages of various student and faculty organizations were the target of hate speech that posed significant attacks on the values we maintain in keeping with the mission of the University.

As a result of these events and the conversations that followed, in January 2014, Vice President of Student Affairs Victor Wilson charged a group of students, staff, and faculty to identify a physical location in the Tate Student Center whereby we could advance the work of diversity and inclusion at UGA. Vice President Wilson was particularly concerned about the postings’ impact on the identities of several underrepresented groups of students, faculty, and staff. He charged the work group to engage in deep dialogue about the University of Georgia we envision and the steps we should take in order to reach that vision. One primary result of these conversations was the development and creation of The Intersection.

The Intersection Reservations

The Intersection Resources

Reserve the Conference Room - Memorial 404F

The MSP Conference room can accommodate 12 people. Reservation requests must be submitted at least 5 business days (Monday – Friday) prior to the event. If food is being served, the reservation must be made at least 10 days in advance.

In order to reserve the conference room after 5:00pm or on weekends by a student organization, a MSP staff member must be present during the meeting.

The room must be left in an orderly manner with trash removed, spills cleaned up and chairs pushed up to the table.

Fill out my online form.

 

Reserving The Intersection

MSP staff are available to support the development/execution of your event. If this is your desire, you must request support in the reservation form.

Reservations are made on a first come first serve basis. MSP staff reserves the right to decline your reservation at any point in time. Reservation requests must be submitted at least 5 business days (Monday – Friday) prior to the event. If food is being served to 25 + individuals, the reservation must be made at least 10 days in advance. The Intersection is closed on game days.

Click here to view the current schedule for The Intersection.

To submit reservation requests, please review the guidelines below and complete the form that follows:

  • The Intersection space is free of charge.
  • The Intersection has three 6ft tables with 6 chairs each. Additionally, there is seating for up to 18 using the social rounds, individual chairs, and couches. The 6 foot tables and corresponding chairs are on casters and can easily be moved or reconfigured. Other furniture pieces should not be moved.
  • Reservations come with access to existing furniture in the space. Requests for additional furniture can be accommodated with a fee associated. For rates on added chairs, tables, podiums, etc. please visit http://reservations.uga.edu/
  • All tables and chairs must be returned to their original location. Failure to do so may result in charges.
  • The University is a smoke free environment. The use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited.
  • Use of candles and glitter are prohibited.
  • The facility reservation comes with the use of AV equipment. You must supply your own laptop and MAC adapter (where necessary). A brief tutorial on this equipment must happen prior to your event. Failure to do so will forfeit access to the AV equipment.
  • Do not leave any personal items or equipment in the room. MSP will not be responsible for anything left in the room
  • Please do not use any type of adhesives on the walls. The chalk wall may be used to advertise future events or as an engagement component of your event. Occasionally, the chalk wall will feature campus artists and will be unavailable for use. Please inquire with MSP staff for the featured artists schedule.
  • We reserve the right to terminate the event at any time if security and/or manager see behavior that may threaten the facility.
  • Please do not remove any items (books, equipment, tables and chairs) from this space.
  • Room must be left in a clean and tidy state after use. Failure to do so may result in charges.
  • The person or organization reserving the space agrees to accept financial responsibility for any damages, including but not limited to, repairing or replacing broken items, cleaning, repainting walls, etc.
  • Report any damage to sgoolsby@uga.edu immediately.
  • We reserve the right to deny or cancel future reservations if policies are not adhered to.
Fill out my online form.

Adinkra Hall

Adinkra is a cotton cloth produced in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire which has traditional Akan symbols stamped upon it. The Adinkra symbols represent popular proverbs and maxims, record historical events, express particular attitudes or behaviors related to depicted figures, or concepts uniquely related to abstract shapes.

Adinkra also means ‘goodbye’ or ‘farewell’ in Twi the language of the Akan ethnic group of which Asante is a part. It has therefore been the tradition of the Akan especially the Asante to wear cloths decorated with Adinkra symbols on important occasions especially at funerals of family relations and friends. This is to signify their sorrow and to bid farewell to the deceased. Today, the Adinkra cloth is not exclusively worn by the Asante people; it is also worn by other ethnic groups in Ghana on a variety of social gatherings and festive occasions.

Adinkra Hall is situated on the 4th floor of Memorial Hall and is available to any campus departments and student organizations for meetings and/or programming. Reservations can be made through Campus Reservations, Events, & Technical Services by visiting http://reservations.uga.edu/ or calling 706-583-8020.

LISTo Mentor Application

LISTo Mentor Application


Hello Potential LISTo Mentor:

Latino/as Invested in the Students of Tomorrow (LISTo) is an organization that works to assist incoming Latinx students, transfer students, or students interested in the culture in successfully transitioning from high school to college. We are pleased that you are interested in joining the LISTo family.

Responsibilities of a LISTo Mentor:

  • Mentors will share their knowledge, experiences, and wisdom to their Mentees. Mentors will guide their Mentees in reaching their goals throughout their college career.

  • Mentors will provide valuable opportunities by facilitating academic, career, and personal contacts. Mentors also encourage growth and achievement by providing an open and supportive environment.

  • As role models, Mentors will share stories of achievement and success to lead by example.

  • Answer e-mails regarding LISTo events

  • Commit time for MANDATORY group meetings, and communicate with your Mentee via phone, internet, and face-to-face interactions.

  • Be enthusiastic and patient

  • Have an interest in developing friendships with other participants

  • Have the ability to commit to the program for one full academic year

  • Have to attend one mentor training session

  • Create a contract with respective Mentee

 

***Membership and all its privileges, including voting and officer positions, must be extended to all students without regard to age, ethnicity, gender, disability, color, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status as stated in the University of Georgia Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy.

 

Fill out my online form.

 

LISTo Mentee Application

LISTo Mentee Application

 

Hello Potential LISTo Mentee:

Latino/as Invested in the Students of Tomorrow (LISTo) is an organization that works to assist incoming Latinx students, transfer students, and students interested in the culture in successfully transitioning from high school to college. We are pleased that you are interested in joining the LISTo family.

What do you get out of being a LISTo Mentee?

  • Information and advice - Mentors will share their knowledge, experiences, and wisdom to you. Mentors will guide their mentees in reaching their goals throughout their freshman year and beyond.

  • Contact and support - Mentors provide valuable opportunities by facilitating academic, career, and personal contacts. Mentors also encourage growth and achievement by providing an open and supportive environment.

  • Role Models - By sharing stories of achievement with Mentees, Mentors can become role models.

  • Access to Faculty Members - Faculty members will provide support and advice for their familia

Mentees should:

  • Possess a willingness to commit time for group meetings, and communicate with your mentor, other mentee and faculty via phone, internet, and face-to-face interactions.

  • Be enthusiastic and patient

  • Have an interest in developing friendships with other participants

  • Have the ability to commit to the program for one full academic year

  • Regularly attend meetings, as it is expected and required

***Membership and all its privileges, including voting and officer positions, must be extended to all students without regard to age, ethnicity, gender, disability, color, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status as stated in the University of Georgia Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy.

 

Fill out my online form.

 

IGNITE Facilitator Application

IGNITE Participant Application

Black Male Leadership Society Application

Fill out my online form.

Resource Library Books

 

Key
A=Asian American L=Latino/Hispanic R=Race Relations
B=Black/African American M=Mixed/Multiracial W=White/European American
I=Indian/South Asian N=Native American U=Universal
*Please see MSP Staff if you plan to use this book for a program
Author Group Title

Arron, Deborah

U

What Can You Do with a Law Degree?

Berry, S. Torriano

B

The 50 Most Influential Black Films

Brown, Tamara L.

B

African American Fraternities and Sororities: the Legacy and the Vision

Cofer, Judith Ortiz

L

Silent Dancing: A Partial Remembrance of a Puerto Rican Childhood

Fleming, Walter C.

N

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Native American History

Frazier, Sundee

M

Check All That Apply: Finding Wholeness as a Multiracial Person

Geok-Lin Lim, Shirley

A

Asian American Literature: An Anthology

Gillespie, Peggy

M

Of Many Colors: Portraits of Multiracial Families

Han, Arar

A

Asian American X: An Intersection of Twenty-First Century Asian American Voices

Hidier, Tanuja Desai

I

Born Confused

Hudson, Wade

B

Book of Black Heroes: Scientists, Healers, and Inventors

Jha, Subhash K.

I

The Essential Guide to Bollywood

Johnson, Charles

B

Black Men Speaking

Leonard, Karen I

I

The South Asian Americans (The New Americans)

Lobo, Susan

N

Native American Voices: A Reader

Malladi, Amulya

I

Serving Crazy with Curry

Morales, Ed

L

Living in Spanglish: the Search for Latino Identity in America

Nam, Vickie

A

YELL-Oh Girls! Emerging Voices Explore Culture, Identity, and Growing Up Asian American

Novas, Himilce

L

Everything you Need to Know About Latino History: 2003 Edition

O’Hearn, Claudine C.

M

Half and Half: Writers on Growing Up Biracial and Bicultural

Ancetta, Angelo N.

A

Race, Rights, and the Asian American Experience

Prasad, Chandra

M

Mixed: An Anthology of Short Fiction on the Multiracial Experience

Pritzker, Barry M.

N

A Native American Encyclopedia: History, Culture, and Peoples

Root, Maria P. P.

M

The Multiracial Experience: Racial Borders as the New Frontier

Ross, Jr., Lawrence C.

B

The Divine Nine: The History of African American Fraternities and Sororities

Schmidt, Peter

B

Color And Money: How Rich White Kids Are Winning the War Over College Affirmative Action

Stewart, Jeffrey C.

B

1001 Things Everyone Should Know About African American History

Alborn, Mitch

M/U

Tuesdays with Morrie: an old man, a young man, and life’s greatest lesson

Anzaldua, Gloria

M/U

Making Face, Making Soul: Haciendo Caras

Various Authors

M/U

Ego Trip’s Big book of Racisms

Jacobson, Matthew

M/U

Whiteness of a Different Color

Kickbusch, Consuelo

M/U

Journey to the Future

Kivel, Paul

M

Uprooting Racisms

Loewen, James

M

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Powell, Michael

U

Behave Yourself: The essential guide to international etiquette

Renn, Kristen

M

Mixed Race Students in College
The Ecology of Race, Identity, and Community on Campus

Root, Maria

M

Racially Mixed People in America

Rothenberg, Paula

M

White Privilege

Schmidt, Peter

M

Color and Money

Schultz, Patricia

U

1,000 Places to See Before You Die

 

Various Authors

 

M

 

Sisters-in-law: An uncensored guide for women practicing law in the real world

Alexie, Sherman

N

Ten Little Indians

Alexie, Sherman

N

The Toughest Indian in the World

Erdoes/Ortiz

N

American Indian Myths and Legends

Jahoda, Gloria

N

The Trail of Tears: The Story of the American Indian Removals 1813-1855

Moore, MariJo

N

Genocide of the Mind

Nabokov, Peter

N

Native American Testimony

Weatherford, Jack

N

Native Roots: How the Indians Enriched America

Unknown Author

L

Reference Library of Hispanic America: Vol. I

Unknown Author

L

Reference Library of Hispanic America: Vol. II

Unknown Author

L

Reference Library of Hispanic America: Vol. III

Alexie, Sherman

L

The Lone Ranger and Tonto First Fight in Heavean

Various Authors

L

Friday Night Chicas

Garcia, Cristina

L

Dreaming in Cuban

Lopez, Tiffany

L

Growing Up Chicana/o

Martinez, Elizabeth

L

De Colores Means All of Us

Morales, Aurora

L

Remedios: Stories of Earth and Iron from the History of Puertorriquenas

Nava, Yolanda

L

It’s All in the Frijoles

Novas, Himilce

L

Everything You Need to Know About Latino History

Rivas-Rodriguez, Maggie

L

Mexican Americans and World War II

Rivera, Geraldo

L

Hispanic

Rodriguez, Luis J.

L

The Concrete River

Santiago, Roberto

L

Boricuas: Influential Puerto Rican Writing An Anthology

Thomas, Piri

L

Down These Mean Streets

Valdes-Rodriquez, Alisa

L

The Dirty Girls Social Club

Valdes-Rodriquez, Alisa

L

Playing With Boys

Valdes-Rodriquez, Alisa

L

Haters

Various Authors

B

The Black Studies Reader

Davis, Leroy

B

A Clashing of the Soul

Douglass, Frederick

B

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

DuBois, W.E.B.

B

The Souls of Black Folk

Gates, Jr., Henry Louis

B

Colored People

Fowler, Virginia

B

The Collected Poetry of Nikki Giovanni 1968-1998

Greene, Melissa

B

The Temple Bombing

Griffin, John

B

Black Like Me

Hooks, Bell

B

Ain’t I A Woman: Black Women and Feminism

Hooks, Bell

B

All About Love: New Visions

Jones, Ricky

B

Black Haze: Violence, Sacrifice, and Manhood in Black Greek-Letter Fraternities

Katz, William

B

Black Indians

Kelley, Brent

B

Voices from the Negro Leagues
Conversations with 52 Baseball Standouts

Kimbrough, Walter

B

Black Greek 101

Speak Out Publications

B

The Color of Fear: The Transcript II

Speak Out Publications

B

Beyond the Color of Fear III

Speak Out Publications

B

Lessons from the Color of Fear: Field Reports IV

Norment Jr., Nathaniel

B

The African American Studies Reader

Smiley, Tavis

B

The Covenant with Black America

Smith, Marcia

B

Black America

Trillin, Calvin

B

An Education in Georgia: Charlayne, Hunter, Hamilton, Holmes and the Integration of the University of Georgia

Various Authors

B

Eclipsing a Nappy New Millennium: An Anthology of Contemporary Midwestern Poetry

Unknown

B

Mandala 199-200 Vol 3

Jha, Subhash

I

The Essential Guide to Bollywood

Aunt Lute

I

Our Feet Walk the Sky: Women of the South Asian Diaspora

Espiritu, Yen Lee

A

Asian American Panethnicity

Hidier, Tanuja

I

Born Confused

Lee, Soann

A

Asian Americans

Lim, Shirley

A

Asian American Literary: An Anthology

Malladi, Amulya

I

The Mango Season

Malladi, Amulya

I

Serving Crazy with Curry

Maria, Sunaina

I

Desis in the House: Indian American Youth Culture in NYC

Prashad, Vijay

I

The Karma of Brown Folk

Novas/Cao/Silva

A

Everything you need to know about Asian American History 2004 Edition

Okada, John

A

No-no Boy

Pham, Andrew

A

Catfish and Mandala

Pradhan, Monica

I

The Hindi-Bindi Club

Prashad, Vijay

R

Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting

Shankar/SriKanth

A

A Part, Yet Apart: South Asians in Asian America

Takaki, Ronald

I

A History of Asian Americans: Strangers from a Different Shore

Tan, Amy

A

The Hundred Secret Senses

Tan, Amy

A

The Joy Luck Club

Wigginton, Russell T.

B

The Strange Career of the Black Athlete

Suskind, Ron

B

Makes Me Wanna Holler

Various Authors

B

Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster

Maxwell, John C.

U

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership

Johnson M.D, Spencer

U

Peaks and Valleys

Gore, W. Gary

U

Navigating Change

Maxwell, John C.

U

Everyone Communicates, Few Connect

MSP Senior Leader Reception

At the end of the spring semester, MSP recognizes the accomplishments and contributions of graduating seniors at the annual Senior Reception. This is an event specifically designed to celebrate graduating students who have been members of a student organization advised by MSP (link to student orgs), and to acknowledge their contributions to and advancement of conversations about diversity and social justice at UGA. At this event, MSP also awards the LK Bates Medal to one student, one community member, and one faculty or staff member who has been a major contributor to MSP or to social justice at UGA.

 

2020 MSP Senior Award Winners

                    

                    

MSP Award for Fortitude

Agozie Onyirimba

MSP Award for Authencity

Christine Makkanal

MSP Award for Zest

Joy Zhang

MSP Award for Advocacy

Matt Osajima

MSP Award for Social Justice

Shree Desai

MSP Award for Community

Tina Phan

 Leslie K. Bates Medal of Excellence

Alyssia Mitchell

Rite of Sankofa

View the 2020 Rite of Sankofa Graduation Page

 

The Rite of Sankofa is an African rite-of-passage ceremony that takes place every May. It is open to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional students graduating in May, August, or December.  The word Sankofa is of West African origin and translates in English to “go back and take,” symbolizing the importance of learning from the past. A main component of this event is to provide students the opportunity to reflect and gather the best of what their past has taught them in order to achieve their full potential as they move forward to begin a new chapter in life.  The ceremony honors not only the graduates but also those that helped them to get where they are today.  This includes families, mentors, faculty, staff, fellow students, and friends.

 

For more information on Rite of Sankofa Graduation Celebration contact Multicultural Services and Programs at ROS@uga.edu.

2019 Rite of Sankofa Photos

2020 Rite of Sankofa Registration is Closed

Cultural Heritage Months

Black History Month (Celebrated in February)

Black History Month honors the contributions of African Americans to United States history. Black History Month began as “Negro History Week,” which was created in 1926 by Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American historian, scholar, educator, and publisher. The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” The month of February was chosen to coincide with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.



Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Month (Celebrated Mar. 15th - Apr. 15th)

The month of May is Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month. May was chosen intentionally to commemorate two specific events in AAPI history: the immigration of the first Japanese immigrants to the United States in May of 1843, and the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in May of 1868. To celebrate AAPI history and heritage during the school year, MSP collaborates with the Asian American Student Association, the Indian Cultural Exchange and other AAPI student organizations at UGA to bring you Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) Heritage Month from March 15th - April 15th. This is a time to celebrate APIDA culture and learn more about various groups that fall under the APIDA umbrella.
   
Latinx Heritage Month (Celebrated Sept. 15 - Oct. 15)

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively.

Native American Heritage Month (Celebrated in November)

The month of November is celebrated nationally as Native American Heritage Month.  The month of November was chosen because it is typically around the time of many Native Americans have harvest and world-renewal ceremonies, powwows, dances, and various feasts. This month recognizes hundreds of different tribes and approximately 250 languages, and celebrates the history, tradition, and values of Native Americans. National Native American Heritage Month serves as a reminder of the positive effect indigenous peoples have had on the cultural development and growth of the U.S., as well as the struggles and challenges they have and continue to face.

UGA Chapter of NAACP

Mission

The mission of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.

 

Vision Statement

The vision of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is to ensure a society in which all individuals have equal rights without discrimination based on race.

 

Objectives

The principal objectives of the Association shall be:

• To ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of all citizens
• To achieve equality of rights and eliminate race prejudice among the citizens of the United States
• To remove all barriers of racial discrimination through democratic processes
• To seek enactment and enforcement of federal, state, and local laws securing civil rights
• To inform the public of the adverse effects of racial discrimination and to seek its elimination
• To educate persons as to their constitutional rights and to take all lawful action to secure the exercise thereof, and to take any other lawful action in furtherance of these objectives, consistent with the NAACP's Articles of Incorporation and this Constitution.

 

History

• State Collegiate Chapter of the Year (2007)
• National Collegiate Chapter of the Year (2007)
• Region 5 Chapter of the Year (2007)
• Globster B. Current Award (2007)
• S.O.A.R. Award [Advisor of the Year]
• Alan English Award

UGA Chapter of NAACP Website

Latino/as Invested in the Students of Tomorrow (LISTo)

Mission Statement

The purpose of LISTo at the University of Georgia shall be to provide academic, social, and emotional support in the form of mentorship for incoming Latinx first-year and transfer students, as well as incoming students who are interested in Latinx culture. The mission is to help provide students with academic success, time management skills, networking, opportunities for internships, to build friendships, and help them transition to college. 

 

Objectives

• To provide academic, social, and emotional support for incoming first-year students.
• To prepare students for the rest of their college career and post graduation.
• Encourage cultural diversity and unity throughout MSP organizations and the Greek community.

 

Programs and Events

• Monthly workshops and social on topics such as study skills, time management, networking, internships, resumes, volunteering, etc.

 

History

• Founded in 2006 by members of Students for Latin @ Empowerment (SLE) through the Office of Institutional Diversity (OID)
• Modeled after the Black Educational Support Team (B.E.S.T.)
• Relocated to the advisement of MSP in 2007

LISTo Mentee Application

LISTo Mentor Application

InfUSion Magazine

Mission Statement

InfUSion Magazine at the University of Georgia serves to provide a journalistic medium where minority students can speak their minds, voice their opinions, and exhibit their creativity.  InfUSion serves as the only multi-cultural magazine on the University of Georgia's campus

 

Objectives

• Provide a platform for minority students to write about pertinent issues and voice their opinions
• Encourage social action and debate about campus, state and national news

 

Membership

• Approximately 55 contributors (writers, editors, photographers, designers, business/marketing team)

 

Programs and Events

• One publication per semester
• Two release parties a year
• Social events within sections
• Editor “Catch up and Coffee” dates

 

History

1999
• Trail Blazer - Kross Kultures Magazine celebrates 10 years of circulation


2001
• Update – Kross Kultures Magazine changed name to infUSion magazine
• Update – infUSion magazine transition from a two-color newspaper print to a full-color glossy layout


2009
• Trail Blazer – 20th Anniversary Edition is released


2011
• 
Published – 1st Flip Book Issue is released

InfUSion Magazine Website

Indian Cultural Exchange (ICE)

Mission Statement

The Indian Cultural Exchange (ICE) of the University of Georgia serves to assist the University in meeting the needs of the Indian student body.  ICE works to bring the Indian community as well as others together through many social, cultural, political and community service events held throughout the academic year.  To these aims the Indian Cultural Exchange shall encourage cultural diversity, articulate the concerns of Indian students, and cultivate relationships with other student organizations and the Athens-Clarke County community. 
Objectives

• To unite students of Indian ethnic background and those who have interest in the Indian culture through activities that invoke cultural and social involvement
• To educate the greater university community about Indian culture

 

Membership

• Approximately 250 active students

 

Programs and Events

• Gandhi Week of Service
• Diwali Dinner
• India Night
• Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month
• Holi

 

History

1992
• Organization was founded


1994
• Hosted 1st India Nite


1995
• Joined to the Minority Services and Programs office and became more formal with the establishment of committees


1998
• UGA ICE was selected as the host of the South Asian Students Association (SASA) conference held in Atlanta


2001 & 2002
• Organization members were selected for Homecoming Court


2003
• India Night was recognized at the annual Student Organization Achievement & Recognition Ceremony (SOAR) as the “Most Outstanding Cultural Event”


2004
• 1st Diwali Dinner held


2005
• 1st South Asian Week held


2006
• Hosted National Gandhi Day of Service with Sigma Beta Rho. India Night was recognized at the annual Student Organization Achievement & Recognition Ceremony (SOAR) as the “Most Outstanding Cultural Awareness Program”


2013
• ICE created the All Interest Indian Alliance to form a coalition for all Indian organizations on campus.

Hispanic Student Association (HSA)

Mission Statement

The Hispanic Student Association (HSA) of the University of Georgia serves to assist the University in meeting the needs of the Hispanic and Latino student body.  HSA works to preserve and promote the richness and diversity of the Hispanic / Latino-American culture.  To these aims the HSA shall encourage cultural diversity, articulate the concerns of Hispanic and Latino students, and cultivate relationships with other student organizations and the Athens-Clarke County community.

 

Objectives

• To inform and promote educational events in regard to the Latino community among all students at the University of Georgia
• To continue the collaboration and co-sponsorship with multiple organizations to ensure understanding across campus
• To bring cultural awareness to the Latino and non-Latino communities at the University of Georgia
• To provide valuable networking and career development opportunities for the Latino and non-Latino members

 

Membership

• Approximately 120 active students

 

Programs and Events

• Noche Latina
• Voces Unidas
• Noche de Amor
• Orgullo Hispano
• Spring Gala

 

History

1992
• Presented - 1st Hispanic Night themed “500 Years of Discovery”


1993
• 
Hosted - 1st Union of Southeastern Hispanic Students
• Published Article - “¿Quien es mas macho?” by Enrigue J. Gonzales in Kross Kultures Magazine


1994
• Presented - 1st Hispanic Film Festival


2000
• Update - Hispanic Night changed name to Fiesta Latina


2001
• Presented - “Latinos in the Dark: Unmasking the Stereotypes” at Dawg Days
• Trail Blazer – Mr. Art Hernandez was slated as a candidate for SGA President
• Trail Blazer – Mr. Kevin Sanchez was slated as a candidate for SGA Vice President


2005
• Hosted - 1st HSA Spring Gala 
• Guest Speaker – Between The Lines Productions, Inc. present: “Platanos & Collard Greens”
• Presented - “¡Oye Mi Canto!” with Lambda Theta Alpha Sorority, Inc.


2011
• Trail Blazer – Celebrated the organizations 20th Anniversary

Black Theatrical Ensemble

Mission and Purpose

The Black Theatrical Ensemble endeavors to not only shed perspective of the Black experience, but also strives to preserve the legacy of Afro-centric theatre through the production of plays, essays, poems, and other literary works written by Black authors and playwrights, and authors of all races who write about issues in the African-American experience.

Persons with an interest in any aspect of the performing arts and persons from all cultural backgrounds are given the opportunity to learn, work, and grow through taking on the roles and responsibilities of a professional theatrical company. Students involved in BTE will create a production team--which involves working in all behind the scenes and stagecraft aspects of a production—as well as develop an ensemble of actors who will perform shows of all genres that relate to black culture.

The ultimate goal of BTE is to function as a collaborative, well-organized team that produces high-quality shows which educate and inspire the campus and community. By generating two major productions and several minor productions per academic year, Black Theatrical Ensemble gives interested individuals the opportunity to cultivate their theatrical abilities and play critical roles in exposing audiences to cultural enrichment.

Black Affairs Council (BAC)

Mission Statement

The Black Affairs Council (BAC) of the University of Georgia serves to assist the University in meeting the needs of the Black student body. BAC works to preserve, enhance, examine, and celebrate Black culture at the University of Georgia. To these aims the Black Affairs Council shall encourage cultural diversity, articulate the concerns of Black students, and cultivate relationships with other student organizations and the Athens-Clarke County community. 
Objectives

• Encourage cultural diversity on campus
• Articulate the concerns of Black students
• Be a champion for racial awareness and equality to support other Black student organizations
• Educate others about the African-American culture
• Maintain a relationship with the Athens-Clarke County community

 

Membership

• Approximately 100 active students

 

Programs and Events

• Cafe Soul
• BACyard BBQ
• Unity Ball

 

History

1981 
• Update - Black Student Union changed name to Black Affairs Council

1996
• Trail Blazer - Ms. Monica Cabbler elected Miss Bulldog & Mr. Edwin Kendrick elected Mr. Bulldog at Homecoming


2003
• Presented - 1st Annual Oratorical Contest
• Trail Blazer – led the “100 Man March” from the Tate Student Center to the Arch in demonstration of declining enrollment of black males


2006
• Update - Founded the Freshman Advisory Board to encourage freshmen to create programming and engage with the campus


2008
• Presented - crowned the 1st Mr. & Miss Scholarship Court of Distinction

Asian American Student Association (AASA)

Mission Statement 

The Asian American Student Association (AASA) at the University of Georgia is organized for the purpose of promoting and providing a cultural and political awareness of Asian and Asian American customs and diversity within the University and the local community. We also act as a support group for those of Asian descent as well as those interested in participating in the association's activities, helping to achieve its principles and objectives.

Objectives

1. To enhance greater understanding among Asian Americans of different nationalities and their backgrounds.
2. To advance social awareness and growth of Asian American college students.
3. To promote interaction between the students of the University of Georgia through club-sponsored events.
4. To exchange culture and educate the greater university community.

With the help of Multicultural Services and Programs, AASA works to develop awareness among the students and faculty here at the University of Georgia about the many interesting facets of Asian Culture. By sponsoring social and cultural events, and promoting Asian speakers, we can help others to become aware of these many facets and help preserve Asian Culture.

Signature Events

  • ​Battle of the Orgs
  • Lunar New Year Festival
  • End of Year Ball

History

1992
Hosted 1st Southeastern Asian Spring Olympic Games
Presented 1st Asian Heritage Week 
Published Article “The Model Minority Myth: Sometimes Racism Wears a Smile” by Frank H. Wu in Kross Kultures Magazine

1993
Hosted 2nd Annual Southeastern Asian spring Olympic Games
Asian Student Union changed the name to Asian American Student Association1994 Guest Speaker - Dr. Elaine H. Kim presents: “Challenges & Avenues of Success for the New Generation of Asian Americans”\

1995 
Trail Blazer - Ms. Wendy Fong became the 1st Asian contestant in the Miss UGA Pageant

1997
Hosted - Asian American Atlantic Coast student Union Conference
Guest Speaker - B.D. Wong presents: “Hope, Change & Equality for Asian Americans”

2003
Reestablished Asian American Student Association by Sarah Chen

2006
Presented - Asian Heritage Month held in over a decade

Black Male Leadership Society (BMLS)

"What I find so intriguing about the BMLS and its members, is that we are constantly finding ways to redefine ourselves. Black male leaders are only three parts of our ever expanding identities. Each of us, with our different talents, gifts, perspectives and opinions, gives society things that are unique in shaping the image of a Black male here at UGA and within the surrounding communities.”

—Charles King, BMLS President

Membership:
$5 Dues + BMLS Application

Signature Events:
• Black Male Leadership Retreat (Fall)
• BMLS Spring Banquet (Spring)

Programs and Events:
Monthly workshops and events centered around service, identity, professionalism, academia, and other avenues for personal and professional success.

Black Male Leadership Society Membership Application

Black Educational Support Team (BEST)

"The Black Educational Support Team (BEST) is an organization like no other; BEST truly embodies the essences of mentor-ship and the commitment it requires. Today, BEST strives to uphold a 20+ year legacy, as we continue to promote both the academic and social development of the students in our program and on the UGA campus." –Zulaikhah Bilal, BEST President

BEST Mentor Application

Completing this application is the first step to becoming a mentor. Make sure to sign up for your interview availability before submitting your application. If you have any questions, please email best@uga.edu. Thank you!

BEST Mentee Application

Vision, Mission and Core Values

Vision Statement:

We envision a University of Georgia that honors the identities, perspectives, and worldviews of our entire community in a way that advances social justice and an institutional way of being that models inclusiveness for all students, faculty, and staff.

 

Mission Statement:

The Office of Multicultural Services and Programs works to create an inclusive campus environment by supporting the development and affirming the overall experiences of all students, particularly multicultural students. With this mission in mind, we:

•  Advise and provide leadership opportunities for 12 multicultural student organizations
•  Provide social justice education programs for the campus community
•  Affirm, advocate, and facilitate learning opportunities around intersections of identities
•  Advocate for the needs of multicultural students and support them in amplifying their voice and developing agency
•  Honor, celebrate, and validate the experiences and cultures of multicultural students within the larger campus community
•  Challenge all students to fully examine issues of equity, oppression, and privilege
•  Foster a safe community of care for multicultural students

 

Core Values:

• Advocacy
  
We are vocal supporters of the needs of multicultural students.  We seek to remove barriers and pursue systemic change that makes it possible for them to thrive.

• Authenticity
  
We value and seek to create a welcoming space where all people can exist as their most authentic selves.

• Community
  We value the importance of relationships that are reflective of a sense of family and belonging.

• Social Justice
  We value social justice as both a process and a goal toward a vision for society that is equitable and where all people are physically and psychologically safe and secure.

• Fortitude
  We pursue the process and goal of social justice with perseverance and unwavering commitment.

• Zest
  We value the optimism of our team in our work together.  This palpable energy makes the heavy work of social justice and the slow pace of change manageable.

Additional Campus Resources

African Studies Institute, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences »

Black Faculty and Staff Organization (BFSO) »

Center for International Trade and Security, School of Public and International Affairs »

Center for Latino Achievement and Success in Education (CLASE), College of Education »


Center for Leadership and Service (CLS) »

Center for Research and Engagement in Diversity »

C.L.A.S.S. Advocate, University Housing »

Department of Religion »

Equal Opportunity Office »

Germanic and Slavic Studies »

GLOBES, Office of Institutional Diversity »

Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences »

Hispanic Scholarship Fund »

Inclusion and Diversity Leadership, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences »

Institute for Women’s Studies, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences »

Institute of African American Studies »

Institute of Native American Studies »

Institute on Human Development and Disability, College of Family and Consumer Science »

International Business Office, Terry College of Business »

International Center for Democratic Governance »

International Student, Scholar and Immigration Services, Office of international Education »

Multicultural Business Student Association, Terry College of Business »

Multicultural Greek Council »

Multicultural Programs, UGA Alumni Association »

Office of Diversity Relations, Terry College of Business »

Office of International Education »

Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences »

Scholarships, Office of Diversity Relations »

Women of UGA, UGA Alumni Association »

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